Without Him, Without Him

Roy – “Doing this without him while we’re waiting for him to come back is one thing, but doing this without him, without him?  That’s a whole other situation.”

Diggle – “Well, what do you want me to tell you Roy!  I can only see one inch in front of me and this is the only thing in front of me right now.”

Well said.  Roy is pointing out the difference between doing something with hope in the background and Diggle is point out the only way we keep moving when we have lost hope.It shows how clearly Roy is in the Broken stage, he doesn’t want to move, where as Diggle is in the Survival stage of this crisis, he is moving but without any clear direction…just trying to get by.  The loss of hope is really one of the hardest part of the Broken stage.  Without hope how can we move?  

“Without Him, Without Him” is a great way to put it because I think it reflects our feelings when we experience great loss.  We are not only without the person we lost but we are also without hope, without company (because we often feel alone in our loss even when we are not) and even without God.  Broken people feel very alone. However, as outside viewers we don’t fully feel this abandonment and loss of hope because we have the God Perspective…hope is never fully gone when the whole story is known.

How to Teach You

“See before you were swinging at your sister’s killer. Don’t train for that, it’s a target you’re never going to hit. Alright, train for yourself.  See, now I know how to teach you.” ~ Laurel’s Coach

When we have a context for what someone is going through it is a lot easier to know how to guide them.  We know this in minor terms in life such as the teacher knowing that what happened at a child’s home affects how their school day will go, or a person sitting in the hospital waiting room is probably on edge…but we seem to forget it in the sense of daily life and in the sense that every person, and every life, is affected by millions of influences.

This quote from the boxing teacher is a good reminder that we don’t know everything about others and we have to be careful about what we say.  It is also a good reminder that the person transitioning into the survival stage is relying heavily on instinctual reactions (Laurel is the perfect example of this instinctual/reactive behavior in this episode and in the one where she attacks the boyfriend of the girl from the AA meeting) AND the person in the survival stage needs training. If they expect to get good training they have to let the trainer in.  Oliver let Slade in, Thea let Malcom in.  It can be hard to trust someone when you are broken and just beginning to learn to survive, however the better our teachers/trainers/guides know us the more they can cater our training.